Japan Disburses US$339.3 Million toward the Fulfillment of its Pledge for the 5th Replenishment

March 27, 2019

The Japanese government disbursed US$339.3 million to the Global Fund from its supplementary budget on March 21, 2019, which brings Japan very close to fulfilling the US$800 million pledge made by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in May 2016, prior to the G7 Ise-Shima Summit.

Following Executive Director Peter Sands’ visit to Tokyo, where he was attending an event to celebrate the 15th anniversary of FGFJ, The Global Fund issued a press release to applaud Japan’s continued commitment to the fight against the three deadly diseases.

Global Fund Press  Release (March 21, 2019):
Japan Makes Significant Contribution to Global Fund

In the press release, the Hon. Ichiro Aisawa—a member of the House of Representative and co-chair of the FGFJ Diet Task Force—is quoted as saying, “We are delighted that the Japanese government and Japanese citizens have stepped up to help people around the world who are battling these deadly diseases. My colleagues on the FGFJ Diet Task Force and I remain strongly committed to ensuring that Japan continues playing a leadership role in helping to achieve the goals of ending the epidemics and advancing health for all.”

On March 26, the Japanese Diet also approved the core national budget for FY2019, which enables the disbursement of the remaining amount to the Global Fund, putting Japan firmly on track to fulfilling its pledge for the 5th replenishment round.


About Japan’s pledge to the 5th replenishment

Just before the G7 Ise-Shima Summit, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged a total of US$800 million for the Global Fund’s 5th replenishment. Compared to its pledge for the 4th replenishment round (2014–2016), that marked a 46% increase in Japanese yen terms, which was the largest increase among the donor countries and public institutions.

Read more about Japan’s previous pledge here.

With total disbursements since 2002 reaching US$3.45 billion, Japan is the 5th largest donor country to the Global Fund, which is estimated to have helped save more than 27 million lives as of 2017 and has helped build resilient and sustainable health systems.